Info

The Florida Bar Podcast

Welcome to the Official Florida Bar Podcast. This monthly series is brought to you by the Florida Bar’s Practice Resource Institute and will feature esteemed leaders in law discussing new and innovative topics. Its purpose is to help members of the Florida Bar as well as attorneys from other states run better practices and provide better legal services to their clients.
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
The Florida Bar Podcast
2017
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
June
May
February


2015
December
November
September
August
July
June
April
March
February
January


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: Page 1
Jun 26, 2017

In this episode of The Florida Bar Podcast from the 2017 Annual Florida Bar Convention, special host Michael Higer talks to Judge Michelle Sisco, Richard Levenstein, Stephen Ware, Dean Cannon, and Brian Fitzpatrick about the Constitution Revision Commission and its potential proposals. They cover the selection process for judges and term limits.

Michael Higer is a partner of Berger Singerman’s dispute resolution team and is an experienced litigator and trial lawyer who has devoted his practice to commercial litigation and civil trial work.

Judge Michelle Sisco sits in the 13th Judicial Circuit Court in Tampa, Florida, and is the incoming chair of The Florida Bar’s Constitutional Judiciary Committee.

Richard Levenstein is the past vice chair of the Constitutional Judiciary Committee and a charter original member of the committee.

Stephen Ware is a professor of law at the University of Kansas where his interests include judicial selection, alternative dispute resolution, commercial law, and private law generally.

Dean Cannon is the executive vice president and statewide chair of government affairs at GrayRobinson.

Brian Fitzpatrick is a professor of law at Vanderbilt Law School. His research at Vanderbilt focuses on class action litigation, federal courts, judicial selection, and constitutional law.

0 Comments